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2.99g ALLENDE Carbonaceous Chondrite Meteorite Slice - Observed Fall

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  • $ 150.00


 

On Offer: 2.99g CV3 - partial slice - Allende Meteorite

Type: CV3 Carbonaceous Chondrite
Origin: Mexico
Year of this Observed Fall: 1969
Official name: Allende
Description: 2.99 gram partial slice of CV3 carbonaceous chondrite meteorite Allende
What you get: 2.99 gram partial slice of CV3 Allende Meteorite Specimen as shown, Membrane Storage/Display Box, & signed Certificate of Authenticity.
I offer a 100% no questions asked 30 day return policy.
SEE OFFICIAL METEORITICAL SOCIETY ENTRY BELOW
Allende
Basic information Name: Allende
     This is an OFFICIAL meteorite name.
Abbreviation: There is no official abbreviation for this meteorite.
Observed fall: Yes
Year fell: 1969
Country: Mexico
Mass: 2 t
Classification
  history:
Meteoritical Bulletin:   MB 45   (1969)   C3
NHM Catalogue:   5th Edition   (2000)   CV3
MetBase:   v. 7.1   (2006)   CV3
Recommended:   CV3    [explanation]

This is 1 of 547 approved meteorites (plus 1 unapproved name) classified as CV3.   [show all]
Search for other: Carbonaceous chondrites, Carbonaceous chondrites (type 3), CV chondrites, and CV-CK clan chondrites
Writeup

Writeup from MB 45:
Warning: the following text was scanned and may contain character recognition errors. Refer to the original to be sure of accuracy.

FALL OF PUEBLITO DE ALLENDE STONY METEORITE SHOWER, MEXICO

Name: PUEBLITO DE ALLENDE.

The place of fall or discovery: The village of Pueblito de Allende, Chihuahua, Mexico; φ = 26°58'N, λ = 105°19'W.

Date of fall or discovery: FALL, February 8, 1969, 7h05m GMT.

Class and type: STONY, carbonaceous chondrite, type III.

Number of individual specimens: METEORITE SHOWER, several dozen were collected.

Total weight: Over 100 kg.

Circumstances of the fall or discovery: The huge fireball lighted up thousands of square miles of Northern Mexico and Southwestern United States. The fireball travelled from south to north. A meteorite shower spread over 50 square kilometers area. There are several pits; the biggest one is 60 cm across and 15 cm deep. Search and preliminary investigation of the meteorites were carried out by Dr. E. King (NASA), Drs. B. Mason and R. Clarke (Smithsonian Institution, Washington, USA) and others.

Source: A telegram and the information reports No. 383, 387, 389, 394, 396, 401 and 402 of the Center for Short-lived Phenomena of the Smithsonian Institution, Cambridge, USA.


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