Menu
Cart 0

Millbillillie Meteorite - 1.9 grams | Eucrite | Witnessed Fall Australia 1960

Top Meteorite

  • $ 50.00


Top Meteorite Trusted Source for Science photo topmeteorite_montage_zpss1exmbtd.jpg

 

 

On Offer: 1.9g Millbillillie Meteorite Partial Slice

Type:  Eucrite | HED Achondrite

Name: Millbillillie

Description: Historic Witnessed Fall Australia 1960 Eucrite HED Achondrite

 

ID - MILLBILLILLIE20170001

 

SEE OFFICIAL METEORITICAL SOCIETY ENTRY BELOW

 

Millbillillie
Basic information Name: Millbillillie
     This is an OFFICIAL meteorite name.
Abbreviation: There is no official abbreviation for this meteorite.
Observed fall: Yes
Year fell: 1960
Country: Australia
Mass: 330 kg
Classification
  history:
Meteoritical Bulletin:   MB 51   (1972)   Eucrite
NHM Catalogue:   5th Edition   (2000)   Eucrite
MetBase:   v. 7.1   (2006)   Eucrite-mmict
Recommended:   Eucrite-mmict    [explanation]

This is 1 of 194 approved meteorites classified as Eucrite-mmict.   [show all]
Search for other: Achondrites, Eucrites, and HED achondrites
Writeup

Writeup from MB 51:
Warning: the following text was scanned and may contain character recognition errors. Refer to the original to be sure of accuracy.

FALL OF THE MILLBILLILLIE, WESTERN AUSTRALIA, STONY METEORITE

Name: MILLBILLILLIE

Place: On Millbillillie and Jundee Stations, Wiluna district, Western Australia.

26° 27'S, 120° 22'E.

Date of fall: October, 1960. Day unknown, but about 1 p.m. local time (0500 GMT). Recovered 1970.

Class and type: Stone. Eucrite.

Number of individual specimens: At least 3

Total weight: At least 25.4 kg

Circumstances of fall: Station workers, F. Vicenti and F. Quadrio, observed a fireball while opening a gate in the boundary fence on the Millbillillie - Jundee track. An object "with sparks coming off it" fell into a spinifex plain to their north. No search was initiated, but D. Vicenti and M. Finch found two stones in this plain in 1970 and 1971. Aboriginals have since found others. The largest stone (20 kg) and one smaller one (565 g) are in the Western Australian Museum.

Source: Dr. R. A. Binns, Department of Geology, University of Western Australia.


We Also Recommend